SPD in Summertime

by ih-chi admin

Dr. Dilip Karnik was recently featured in an article about SPD: Sensory Processing Disorder and how to spot it in kids.

SPD is when someone has an adverse reaction to a sound, touch, taste, or smell. It can kick into high gear during the summertime when physical heat and discomfort might trigger this type of emotional stress.

Here are five common summer sensations to watch out for if your child is affected by SPD:

1.            Being Barefoot

Some kids don’t like the feel of hot pavement, prickly grass, or sand on a beach. Rubber shoes made for use in the water or an old pair of sneakers are good options for protecting their feet.

2.            Wearing Flip-Flops

Other children may have sensitivities to the thin rubber piece between toes found on flip-flops. Some kids may even be afraid of the distinctive sound they make when walking. Check out rubber water shoes, old sneakers, or slide sandals instead.

3.            Buzzing Bugs and Bites

The sounds of insects are a constant in summertime. To a child who is hypersensitive, the noises alone can inflict itchiness and mimic the feel of an actual bite. Avoid time outside during dawn and dusk hours when bugs are busiest, and have your child wear a wide-brimmed hat to keep insects away from face and ears.

4.            Sporting Swimsuits

The tight, fitted feel of a swimsuit can feel too confining to a child with clothing sensitivities. Sitting around in wet suit after swimming can be problematic also. Try a pair of looser-fitting board or surf shorts along with a rash guard on top that’s a size or two larger than normal so they don’t feel restricted. Always have dry clothes on hand to change into immediately after swimming to avoid the dampness.

5.            Watching Fireworks

Festivals all summer long and the Fourth-of-July paint the sky with colorful-yet very loud-fireworks. If sensitive to loud noises, have your child watch from a window inside somewhere or in a car. Headphones or ear plugs may help too.

(Adapted from Understood)